How many sets of golf clubs should a beginner have?

If you're a beginner golfer, you should start with 10 golf clubs. You can play golf with fairway wood, iron and putter, but you'll want to learn to use more clubs if you want to be able to handle any situation. You can find sets specifically labeled for beginners that offer 6 to 9 clubs, and are probably the best option for a developing player. The only equipment left with the Strata 11-piece set is a dozen balls and a bag of t-shirts.

You really get the full set. It consists of driver, fairway wood, two hybrids, 6-PW irons, putter and a support bag. We were impressed by the performance offered. In particular, throughout the set they are easy to throw and forgive.

TaylorMade has designed a lineup of 14 clubs here that we think has real mass appeal. For those who don't want to get in shape but are still looking for a quality set that works and looks good, the TaylorMade RBZ SpeedLite is worth considering, though the bag is designed more for use in a cart than for carrying it. With 14 clubs, beginners really get the whole package, and it includes a premium Odyssey putter, which more than justifies the price of the set. There is an argument that if you spend this amount of money, you better adapt to the measure, but the fact is that not everyone wants to go that way.

This package is the closest thing to a set of premium golf clubs at an affordable price. Meanwhile, the wide sole of the sand wedge makes escaping bunkers much easier, which is an area of the game that beginners can really struggle with. This set comes with a 10.5° driver, a three-wood, a hybrid, a 6-iron sand wedge and an excellent putter to combine. Other sets may come with more clubs (this is a 10-piece set), but that means you can add additional clubs, perhaps as your game improves.

The best golf club sets for beginners don't have to be really expensive either, as this game proves. The 13-piece Top Flite XL complete set is an excellent choice for new golfers at a very competitive price. A benefit of this set is that the driver, fairway wood and hybrids are equipped with graphite axles, which makes them easier to balance while promoting distance. Irons, however, have steel rods, which will give new players a better chance of learning to control their distances as they play more often.

The CG3000 is an entry-level game, with the 13° driver, low-profile street and hybrid designed in such a way that they are easy to hit. Meanwhile, irons (steel and graphite options available) feature an undercut cavity to keep the center of gravity low and deep, so golfers should find them easier to throw. Since you also get a mallet style stick and the option of a premium stand or stroller bag, there's no doubt that this set offers great value for money. In addition, MacGregor offers 1 longer or shorter steel support options with clubs, making them suitable for taller and shorter golfers.

The complete Stix golf set contains 14 clubs, from driver to putter. The set consists of a driver; 3 and 5 woods; 4 hybrids; 5 irons up to the throwing wedge; three wedges (52°, 56° and 60°) and a putter. This set of 11 sticks is designed for forgiveness and power, as the name suggests. Iron play can be a very frustrating part of the game for beginners, but these oversized (5-SW) irons feature an undercut cavity to create a larger sweet spot for a higher pitch and more forgiveness.

Another premium option on this list of the best golf club sets for beginners. This set comes with 10 clubs in total, frustratingly short of a full set, including a 10.5° 460cc driver, a 5-wood club and an easy-to-hit hybrid club. Another great starter pack offered by Wilson, who makes many of these types of sets. The irons (6-SW) are particularly tolerant and the 10.5°, 3-wood and 4-hybrid driver can be thrown very easily thanks to the light graphite shafts used.

A beginner to the game of golf needs to keep things simple, and the same can be said for clubs. As a result, most good beginner sets come with a driver, some type of fairway wood or hybrid (or both), half set of irons with regular loft gaps, some type of wedge and obviously a putter. Usually, we see that beginner sets come with 9 or 11 suits, and once a player improves in the game, they can figure out how to fill the last spots in the bag. If you're new to the game, completing golf sets and building your own bag are good options, since you don't necessarily need all 14 clubs.

Beginner golfers tend to start with a driver, an iron set, a sand wedge and a putter. Add a golf bag and you'll have enough to get started. If you want to look into other golf bag options, see which golf bag is right for you. It may be worth buying just one pair of clubs at this time to get started and make sure you want to dedicate yourself to golf.

This club will help you lift the ball off the grass on the street and still get a good distance with decent accuracy. To this day, Joey suggests starting with a half game or a two-thirds set, starting with irons of 3, 5, 7 and 9 and wooden sticks of 3 and 5.As soon as you start playing golf, it's natural that you start to want to compare yourself to other players. You only need one driver in your golf bag and you can choose from a variety of driver's lofts depending on the flight of the ball you want. Add a throwing wedge, sand wedge, and putter and you've got all the essential sticks you need to rock the field.

So how many golf clubs does a beginner need? Beginning golfers should aim for 8-10 clubs to start, rather than a full set of 14.The most common problem for beginning players is incorrect strokes, which limit distance and make accuracy difficult. Beginner golf clubs are a little more lenient if your swing and contact aren't quite right, which is very common when you start. We test the series on the field and over several rounds to see how they perform in different fields and under different conditions. If you use golf clubs that are easier to use to start with (even if they aren't as powerful), you can get more balls on the green and put more balls in the hole.

Hybrids are more tolerant of bad blows, are more versatile, are designed so that golfers can hit the ball higher and are better equipped to compensate for the typically lower swing speeds of beginner golfers, who are enemies of a good long iron game. . .

Marjorie Mitchell
Marjorie Mitchell

General coffee advocate. Hardcore social media scholar. Unapologetic travelaholic. Freelance social media ninja. Extreme tv evangelist.

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